We have seen some incredible use cases of Ushahidi over the past five years, the majority of which we could never have dreamed of. Erik posted a blog post about how we choose to go wide instead of just deep by creating a tool that was purposefully a platform. We have been blown away by the creativity of our community, using Ushahidi to gather data about everything from corruption to environmental monitors, from reporting clinic medicine stockouts to creating a record of land grabs in India or mapping powercuts. And of course the huge and incredible community around monitoring human rights abuses, election monitoring, and crisis response.

The mobile phone has been at the core of Ushahidi’s strategy when building tools for citizen engagement. Its ubiquitous nature makes it the easiest tool to use and ensure that a vast majority of citizens can actively participate. We’ve seen this to be the case in many past Ushahidi deployments, such as Uchaguzi( deployment to monitor the 2013 kenyan general elections). Most of the reports that came into the platform during that time were …

On a single day in March last year, three countries — Tanzania, Kenya and Mozambique announced discoveries of oil and gas (joining Uganda as possible oil and gas producers.) This was momentous, and according to this article in The East African, there are several major infrastructure projects in the East African region that are unprecedented. With all these projects in the region the question of transparency and engagement with citizens affected comes up.

(The original post appeared on the MediaShift / Knight Projects: IdeaLab, December 9, 2011.)

There’s a problem that constantly plagues us in this day of information overload, and that is the ability to sift the stream of incoming information into the bits that are valuable from those that aren’t. It’s a tough issue that we’ve been working on at Ushahidi, and re-working, a solution on for a while now. Our solution is called …

The Ushahidi community survey results are in! We’ve been fortunate to have people share their input and feedback to help us improve. The key themes were:

Ushahidi needs stronger, unified documentation (a master wiki) Provide an accountable customer service work-flow Create an open development process, and Increase community programming to support mentorship and training. Who is our community?

Ushahidi is used by five primary groups: international/local development, crisismappers/community capacity/civil society, media/communications, non-governmental/non-profit and governmental …

iLab Liberia, a project of the Ushahidi Liberia team, has been bustling since it opened this May.  iLab has become Liberia’s go-to resource center for local IT professionals, a training ground in open source software and has been known to throw a pretty mean mapping party.

We’ve told you a bit about iLab on this blog before, but now we have a visual aid to better introduce ourselves.  We started the space as …

The work of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in the recent floods in Queensland has been nothing short of remarkable. ABC was in the middle of piloting some of our new products internally when a true disaster struck in the form of sever flooding in the north eastern Australian state. In a matter of hours their trial of our products escalated to an actual emergency deployment, with their staff, and our own racing …