Reclaimnaija is a broad-based citizens’ platform, which was set up to enhance the participation of grassroots people, organizations and local institutions in promoting electoral transparency, accountability and democratic governance in Nigeria.

Why ReclaimNaija?

A look at the history of elections in Nigeria shows that there is weak public confidence in the integrity of the electoral process due to previous experience of massive electoral fraud in the country. The way the business …

We like to say that our mission with the SwiftRiver project is to democratize access to the tools used for understanding information. To me that means taking the hard-work out of drawing insight from excessive quantities of data, to help humans process things more efficiently. That’s why it was huge honor to announce the SwiftRiver project’s ongoing collaborations with software developer Pete Warden earlier this year.

Earlier this week Pete announced …

The following post was written by Hugh Brooks of the Navanti Group who wanted to share his experience with the new checkin features for Ushahdi and Crowdmap. He and his colleague Ravi Gupta used checkins for their Applelines project.

Our first Crowdmap was georgetownreport.crowdmap.com, a citizen reporting deployment for all things local in Washington, DC Georgetown area. One of the categories we added was for reports on the Georgetown …

One of the problems a lot of crowdsourcing projects have is that they end up pulling in massive amounts of data from the web, Twitter and other channels from around the world. This means content arrives in many different languages, often languages that the deployer doesn’t speak.

Currently in Sweeper and soon in Ushahidi, users can translate real-time content from one language into another, on the fly, as they receive it. This is …

Recently we began conducting research into the use of our various products around the world, assessing impact and use, apparent successes, perceived and critical failures, as well as qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the data collected from each platform deployment.

This report looks at the lessons we’ve learned around three years of assisting with crowdsourced campaigns. Specifically in the areas of: motivating participation, typical challenges faced by deployers, ideas on funding, and dealing with excessive …

[Post written with Jennifer Chan. This post is the second in a series of blog posts documenting a 9-month Ushahidi evaluation project in partnership with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative supported by the Knight Foundation.]

The Ushahidi-Kenya evaluation is off to a strong start. Since returning from Nairobi in January, 2011 we have worked on the self-evaluation and assessment tool for individuals and organizations interested in using Ushahidi. The purpose of the tool is to …

Recently we began conducting research into the use of our various products around the world, assessing impact and use, apparent successes, perceived and critical failures, as well as qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the data collected from each platform. What’s perhaps, different about this particular document is that it also looks at non-crisis deployments like Vacant NYC. Because we rarely deploy Ushahidi, this data was volunteered by the owners of each deployment.

We wanted …

[Guest blog post by Heather Leson, an idea hacker and community builder. Haiti changed her life and inspired her to become a serial volunteer for digital response (CrisisCommons, CrisisMappers, Stand-by Task Force) and an Ushahidi user for the past year. She blogs at textontechs.com and tweets on @heatherleson]

Ushahidi Mappers in Canada!

Be still my prairie girl heart. Laura Madison and Dale Zak spent the winter …

We’re trying to come up with other ways of visualizing Ushahidi data. Using the Ushahidi API, Emmanuel whipped up a heatmap of the Japan deployment (http://sinsai.info/ushahidi).

You can see it live here: http://demo.ushahidi.com/japan. On the live map, you can toggle the clustered numbers on/off using the “stack” button on the right side of the map.

Japan earthquake Ushahidi data, heatmapped

We’re thinking of doing two things to make this …

Members of the Japanese OpenStreetMap community launched an Ushahidi platform for Japan just hours after the devastating earthquake struck the country. Less than 24 hours later, Japanese students at The Fletcher School in Boston (where the Ushahidi-Haiti project was run last year) mobilized to support the Tokyo-based crisis mapping project. Today, almost 3,000 individual reports have been mapped on the platform.

We are shocked by the incredible devastation that the earthquake …